Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Over 100 names missing on voters’ roll in Binga

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MDC-T Matabeleland North provincial spokesperson Themba Munkombwe has claimed that over 100 villagers’ names were missing from the voters’ roll at one of the polling stations in Binga after they registered during the biometric voter registration (BVR) exercise.
BY SILAS NKALA
Munkombwe said they uncovered the anomaly during a tour of the polling stations around the districts when people complained that their names were missing from the voters’ roll.
“We are working tirelessly on the ground since the inception of the BVR blitz, thereby notifying Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (Zec) officials of any irregularities found. Pashu Primary polling station in ward 14 in Binga district has taken the lead as most registrants couldn’t find their names despite having registration slips,” he said.
“Between May 19 and May 25, 103 registrants with registration slips couldn’t totally find their names on the voters’ roll. A total of 446 registrants as at May 25 had checked their names, 22 registrants by then had their names or surnames or IDs incorrectly written.”
Munkombwe accused Zec of not performing its duties accordingly and honestly.
“We understand a few names are said to be at Dungu polling station, which is 30km away from Pashu, how come?” he said.
“However, new registrants since the BVR inspection started were 114 because some had attained 18 years and were in possession of IDs, while others were not there during the previous BVR exercise”
He said Zec should not to give registrants doubts about its accountability, transparency and independence.
Contacted for comment, Zec provincial elections officer, Mark Ndlovu said he was unaware of the matter, but acknowledged that such irregularities were possible in an area where people shared similar names and surnames.
“They have not yet come to me. There is a district elections officer there in Binga, I think they got to him first before the concerns could be sent to me. So far, I have not got anything from there,” Ndlovu said.
“But these issues exist mainly because of sharing same identity and such people are placed on an exclusion list until their identities are regularised.”