Saturday, May 19, 2018

Why Chamisa will win 2018 elections

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BILL Taylor, in his article Do you pass the leadership test, alludes to the fact that the true mark of a leader is the willingness to stick with a bold course of action — an unconventional business strategy, a unique product development roadmap, a controversial marketing campaign, which even the rest of the world would wonder why you are not marching in step with the status quo.
By Edwin Ndlovu
Taylor further states that leaders instil in their people a hope for success and self belief.
Positive leaders empower people to accomplish their goals.
As the election season nears, electioneering has started, political parties and their alliances and coalitions have upped their game and it is a fact to say the real contest is between Zanu PF’s Emmerson Mnangagwa and MDC Alliance’s Nelson Chamisa.
The elections are dubbed the clash of the old and new order.
While Mnangagwa promises some change as well, it is debatable whether a Zanu PF government, which he has been part of since 1980, can bring any positive change to the country after it had been in power for a solid 38 years.
It is easier for a man to be impregnated by a woman than for Mnangagwa and Zanu PF to bring change the people of Zimbabwe desire.
A free, fair and credible election can never produce a Zanu PF victory.
Chamisa stands alone as the only presidential candidate capable of winning the election.
He has what it takes to become the first democratically elected leader of the country, who is acceptable across the wide section of our society.
In Ndebele we say “inkunzi ikhethwa ematholeni”, which literally means a leader is identified or chosen in early stages of life.
Chamisa fits in very well in that Ndebele proverb.
Chamisa announced his entry into politics during his college days when he was appointed Harare Polytechnic’s Student’s Representative Council (SRC) president in his first year in 1998.
The college’s authorities took notice of his presence and suspended him for allegedly inciting violence.
He was readmitted after a High Court ruling.
He was not dissuaded by the suspension but hardened and was later on elected Zimbabwe National Students’ Union secretary general the following year.
He was to become the MDC youth president and Kuwadzana MP at 25.
His bravery and outspokenness won the hearts of the MDC family leading to his appointment as the party’s spokesperson where he rose through the ranks to become its leader today.
There has been debate about the seniority of the party leadership in some quarters, but those who know the genesis of the movement would agree with me that of the eight management committee members of the party in 2000, he together with Welshman Ncube and Gift Chimanikire are the only survivors after the deaths of our dear leaders, Morgan Tsvangirai, Gibson Sibanda, Isaac Matongo and Fletcher Dulini Ncube.
The other survivor is Lucia Matibenga, who is now a member of a coalition led by former Vice-President, Joice Mujuru.
Since being ushered in as the country’s leader, Mnangagwa has said one positive truth, just one, that the voice of the people is the voice of God.
When MDC-T structures, the national council and national executive, were debating and voting for a new party leader, I went around listening to the voice of people.
I attended Tsvangirai’s burial and thousands of mourners sang a song that literally said as much as they were now orphans, Chamisa was there to look after them.
I attended rallies in Masvingo, Kwekwe, Gweru, Plumtree and Bulawayo, where the crowds sang the same song, the people had chosen their leader.
When one thought Chamisa had been endorsed by party structures and general members only, leaders of political parties in the alliance also added their voices, saying Chamisa was the only foot forward.
Who then would go against the voice of the people, which is the voice of God?
In terms of appreciating issues, Chamisa is miles ahead of other presidential hopefuls.
He understands the legal terrain, is spiritually connected as a pastor and has several qualifications in marketing, political science, international relations and diplomacy and governance and development studies.
Chamisa’s campaign message is pregnant with hope for transformation.
So far he has addressed issues directly affecting the people, like eradicating corruption, an improved transport network, hence, the call for bullet trains and spaghetti roads, which is confusing the junta, hence, Steve Jobs argued that innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.
While Chamisa agrees that the land redistribution is irreversible, he argues that his administration would in an honest and transparent manner do a land audit and also allocate title to the land.
The message resonates well with the general populace.
It is also pleasing to note that he fully understands the plight of our traditional leaders and former freedom fighters and promises to address their plight in the shortest possible time.
What makes Chamisa’s promises acceptable is that he and his team were tried and tested during the government of national unity of 2009 to 2013.
Tendai Biti, Welshman Ncube, David Coltart are still in the team.
Their transformation agenda is on course.
Our economy improved and liquidity challenges disappeared during Biti’s reign as Finance minister.
Teachers went back to the classrooms during Coltart’s reign as Education minister and Ncube rehabilitated some industries that were operating below 10% to move to about 60% operational and he shall be remembered forever for getting Ziscosteel an investor, but Zanu PF functionaries, who are still in power today, torpedoed the deal for selfish reasons.
When Chamisa speaks of a transformation agenda, he really means it. He has the zeal, the will and the right tools to use.
It is very displeasing to note that those who have been dining with Mugabe since 1980 still want to push the blame to the old man alone and present themselves as angels to the people of Zimbabwe, we have seen the signal on how to deal with them.
The nation is optimistic that change is nigh and Chamisa is the man.
Their transformation agenda is on course.
Our economy improved and liquidity challenges disappeared during Biti’s reign as Finance minister.
Teachers went back to the classrooms during Coltart’s reign as Education minister and Ncube rehabilitated some industries that were operating below 10% to move to about 60% operational and he shall be remembered forever for getting Ziscosteel an investor, but Zanu PF functionaries, who are still in power today, torpedoed the deal for selfish reasons.
When Chamisa speaks of a transformation agenda, he really means it.
He has the zeal, the will and the right tools to use.
It is very displeasing to note that those who have been dining with Mugabe since 1980 still want to push the blame to the old man alone and present themselves as angels to the people of Zimbabwe, we have seen the signal on how to deal with them.
The nation is optimistic that change is nigh and Chamisa is the man.
Warren G Bennis sums it all when he says leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality, which Chamisa can with God willing.
strong> Edwin Ndlovu is the People’s Democratic Party deputy spokesperson, he writes in his personal capacity